People & Inspiration

Cheat Sheet: Christmas Etiquette—Choose To Mend And Not Offend This Season

Cheat Sheet: Christmas Etiquette—Choose To Mend And Not Offend This Season

We meet and greet, we style and treat, yet in the midst of it all there are a couple of situations bound to come up during Christmas dinners that could make things turn awkward in a split second this season. Here are a couple of topics to avoid in making Christmas conversation and some better recommended talking points in their stead:

 

1. Avoid commenting on a person's weight, whether they've lost or gained (unless they're a really close loved one. who's been working on that pro-actively for a health condition). 

via GIPHY

 

2. Avoid bluntly assuming someone who you knew was in a relationship is still with someone, when asking how they are, ask directly about them individually. E.g. "How are you? How have you been? It's been awhile." and allow them to share instead of "How are you and so-and-so?" which might trigger unexpected feelings in a gathering if they are no longer together.

via GIPHY

 

3. Avoid blatantly talking about where you shopped for gifts, how expensive some were, or even the opposite, about the deals you got. Unless you are siblings or relatives partnered in shopping trips, at Christmas gatherings let the gifts you got speak for themselves once opened. It's not in good form to harp about what you spent or didn't spend in order to give someone something. Mentioning that things you got were expensive borders on snobbish (depending on context) and puts undue pressure on the other people also giving gifts while saying you got good deals reveals you scrimped on certain people's gifts which is unnecessary discussion even if it is true. 

via GIPHY

 

4. Avoid bringing up someone else's terminal illness with their loved one by suddenly mentioning it with too much gravity and in too much detail. It is okay to wonder about someone you've heard who is ill, but take care and be light in inquiring at the beginning. Instead of saying something heavy like "How is so-and-so doing? Someone told me it's BAD and he/she has a tumor that needs to be removed or Stage 4 cancer and that chances are slim," even if all that is true you can instead say "How is so-and-so? I was concerned because I heard that he/she is not doing well. What are the chances of recovery? How do you feel, is there any way I can help?" then allow the loved to mention the medical aspects of the person's condition instead of you bringing up the words "cancer," "tumor," and other unpleasant things they  are currently facing. 

via GIPHY

 

5. Avoid debates, put politics on pause in main spaces or choose your time and place for that sort of discussion wisely. While political opinions matter greatly to many of us, there is a time and place to be firm in your cause. I won't say that it's wrong to bring up politics during Christmas, but it is wise to find a suitable time, person, and place for that sort of discussion because strong differing feelings usually erupt between people.  

via GIPHY

 

Perhaps it is better to convene individuals in an area of the venue which is not the main space where people are enjoying, like a den or balcony that is set apart. Discussions of this sort are certainly of great importance and can actually, in some odd cases, bond people in a unique way but usually do not add to the jovial spirit of Christmas gatherings.

 

ALSO READ: Cheat Sheet: These Recipes From "FOOD Tastings: Holiday Feast" Will Amp Up Your Noche Buena Spread

 

 

 

Latest

Popular

Trending

The Writer

View All

Recommended from Other ABS-CBN Websites